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Old 27-10-2004, 02:18 PM   #11
ydolphin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shiokmc
totally agree w points 1--3 ...and 6
but for point 4... please NOTE that its not the MAJORITY of 'mutated' or 'patterned' Tigers that are susceptible to SuddenDeath Syndromes.... might just be coincidental.... because ANY kind of tiger can have 101Factors that led to such 'sudden-deaths'

as for point 5, well...from a hobbyist point of view, rather subjective. As long as you like the tiGer and have the money and willing to pay --BUY it... does not really matter what kind of tiger it might be

BroJebus, im not arguing with your statements ...just expressing a tiger-lover's n hobbyist's opinion
Will tend to agree with you about pt 4 as it is more of a concidence that trend that forkies and whatever has a higher probability of SDS. This can only be a fact if we have a bigger sample base and all the bros who purchased the MTs saw a high mortality rate in 'different' patterned MTs. Personal experience so far is 3 MTs, all irregular patterns and only once succumbed to white spot and shock from wc whilst the other 2 is about 2.5''+ now.
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Old 27-10-2004, 06:40 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jebus
6) tiger prices fluctuate regularly, but prices of tigers have been falling lately. so if u think u want to buy a tiger as an investment, please do not do so.
and if u ever have an unwanted tiger, please DO NOT RELEASE into the local waterways! tigers are top predators in the food chain, and not native to singapore.


THINK TWICE BEFORE YOU BUY

This is so true about NOT buying tigers as an investment, likewise with all other pets that we keep. And releasing fishes into public ponds is really an irresponsible thing to do.
With regards to pricing, i think its more closely related to quality preferences, you never know when it will fall or rise, its simply entirely dependant on the beauty of each individual tiger, and how it calls out to the buyer! People like it, pay for it!
 
Old 03-11-2004, 02:06 AM   #13
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Grading is derived frm humans, us. we create grades. but being humans, we make mistakes, we are not perfect. nothing is absolute.

Whoever makes this grading for aros may not be correct, esp for the gradings of tailess or albino white eyes or hunch backed aros... they say these type of fishes r priceless or at least worth much more than a normaL looking type or genre of aro... but on what basis? the availability factor or the uniqueness factor or the power of buyer factor?

As such, grades r all man made... not absolute truths...

I not refuting the claim of any literature review made by fish aficionados or specialists, but im saying tt we r all humans including the aficionados, as nothing is absolute in the world.. so gradings r subjective and perceptive..


Cheers!
Daniel
 
Old 03-11-2004, 02:58 AM   #14
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NGT and ST is a good comparison
the way a NGT looks now is the same as it looked years ago and how it comes from the wild (natral looking) and hardly ever come on to the market with defects

Just take a look at the way ST look now to what they looked like before the craze started and people just went mad and buy buy just because its the fish to have NOW

you had a tank full of perfect thick 3 stripe ST and a tank full of patchy crap which tank will be empty 1st

perfect ST are now harder to find than the one with H,Y forks or what ever
so nice perfect ST are now the rare one
 
Old 07-11-2004, 11:55 PM   #15
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IT and CT that have the longer slimmer body shape and true good grade ST that have the deeper body
 
Old 25-02-2005, 01:34 PM   #16
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Some additional information taken frm waterwolves.com/Fishbase.org


Datnioides pulcher

Common Names: widebar datnoid, Siamese tigerfish, gold datnoid, tiger datnoid

Family: Datnioididae

Order: Perciformes (perch-likes)

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)

Max. size: 18-24 inches, although relatively slow-growing and long-lived

Environment: freshwater, rivers.

Distribution: southeast Asia, specifically Mekong and Chao Phraya river basins

Description (courtesy of fishbase.org): Distinguishable by its regular color pattern consisting of 4 or 5 regular and broad bars on body; bar 1 from nape through opercle onto thoracic region and across ventral surface of the body; bar 2 from base of dorsal spines 2-5 to slightly in front of anal fin origin; bar 3 starts at base of dorsal spine 9 to base of dorsal ray 2, and ends at base of anal rays 2-6; bar 4 on posterior half of caudal peduncle.

Temperament: semi-aggressive, more aggressive towards same or similar species.

Water paramenters: Prefers clean water, pH 6.5-7.5, temperature 76-82 degrees F. Although primarily a freshwater species that requires no salt, also does well in light brackish conditions (up to SG 1.005). (As will be discussed later, other datnoid species occur in brackish conditions, hence the common misconception that all datnoids are brackish.)

Feeding: Although often fed live fish, this species can be trained to accept shrimp, krill, frozen brine shrimp, beefheart, earthworms, and even Hikari Sinking Carnivore Pellets.
 
Old 25-02-2005, 01:35 PM   #17
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Datnioides undecimradiatus

Common Names: thinbar datnoid, Siamese tigerfish, gold datnoid, tiger datnoid

Family: Datnioididae

Order: Perciformes (perch-likes)

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)

Max. size: 16 inches, although relatively slow-growing and long-lived

Environment: freshwater, rivers.

Distribution: southeast Asia, specifically Mekong River basin

Description (courtesy of fishbase.org): Dorsal spines (total): 12-12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 16-19; Anal spines: 3-3; Anal soft rays : 10-11. Body depth 2.1-2.4 times in SL; relatively narrow vertical bars, the first bar usually not continued onto thorax or across ventral surface of body and the second bar originating at the base of 5th to 6th dorsal-fin spine; usually 11 branched anal-fin rays (Ref. 27732); about 17 scale rows between upper part of lateral line and dorsal base (Ref. 10425).

Temperament: semi-aggressive, more aggressive towards same or similar species.

Water paramenters: Prefers clean water, pH 6.5-7.5, temperature 76-82 degrees F. Although primarily a freshwater species that requires no salt, also does well in light brackish conditions (up to SG 1.005). (As will be discussed later, other datnoid species occur in brackish conditions, hence the common misconception that all datnoids are brackish.)

Feeding: Although often fed live fish, this species can be trained to accept shrimp, krill, frozen brine shrimp, beefheart, earthworms, and even Hikari Sinking Carnivore Pellets.
 
Old 25-02-2005, 01:35 PM   #18
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Datnioides microlepis

Common Names: Indonesian datnoid, Siamese tigerfish, gold datnoid, tiger datnoid

Family: Datnioididae

Order: Perciformes (perch-likes)

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)

Max. size: 18 inches, although relatively slow-growing and long-lived

Environment: freshwater, rivers and lakes.

Distribution: southeast Asia, including Chao Phraya and Mekong basins of the mainland and the Kapuas basin in western Borneo and Musi basin in Sumatra.

Description (courtesy of fishbase.org): Has the deepest body of any species of Coius , 2.1-2.4 times in SL. Specimens from mainland Southeast Asia invariably with five full bars, specimens from Borneo with 6-7 bars, all usually continued across ventral surface of body. First bar extending uninterrupted and undiminished across opercle and onto thoracic region, and continued across ventral surface of body; a well defined black mark on ventral surface of body immediately anterior to base of pelvic fins (not present in other Coius). Partial bars almost invariably absent. Branched dorsal rays 14-18; branched anal rays 9-11, usually 10 (Ref. 10425).

Temperament: semi-aggressive, more aggressive towards same or similar species.

Water paramenters: Prefers clean water, pH 6.5-7.5, temperature 76-82 degrees F. Although primarily a freshwater species that requires no salt, also does well in light brackish conditions (up to SG 1.005). (As will be discussed later, other datnoid species occur in brackish conditions, hence the common misconception that all datnoids are brackish.)

Feeding: Although often fed live fish, this species can be trained to accept shrimp, krill, frozen brine shrimp, beefheart, earthworms, and even Hikari Sinking Carnivore Pellets.
 
Old 25-02-2005, 01:36 PM   #19
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Datnioides quadrifasciatus

Common Names: silver datnoid, four-barred Siamese tigerfish

Family: Datnioididae

Order: Perciformes (perch-likes)

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)

Max. size: 12 inches, although relatively slow-growing

Environment: fresh and brackish water.

Distribution: southeast Asia, Indonesia, and New Guinea.

Description (courtesy of fishbase.org): Dorsal spines (total): 12-12; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13-14; Anal spines: 3-3; Anal soft rays : 8-9. Predorsal profile strongly concave; total gill rakers on first arch 20-23; scales large, about 40-60 in lateral series; anal fin branched rays 9; color pattern highly variable; up to 7 full vertical bars on body, sometimes with 1 to 4 partial bars between full bars (Ref. 10425).

Temperament: semi-aggressive, more aggressive towards same or similar species.

Water paramenters: Prefers clean water, pH 7.0-8.0, temperature 76-82 degrees F. This datnoid species prefers light brackish conditions, specific gravity around 1.005, over freshwater environments. IME, this species does not like pHs below 6.5.

Feeding: Although often fed live fish, this species can be trained to accept shrimp, krill, frozen brine shrimp, beefheart, earthworms, and even Hikari Sinking Carnivore Pellets.
 
Old 02-03-2005, 03:43 PM   #20
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Coius campbelli

Common Names: New Guinea Tigerfish, Blackfaced Tigerfish, & Green Tiger.

Family: Datnioididae, now --> Coiidae

Order: Perciformes (perch-likes)

Class: Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes)

Max. size: 12.5 inches, although relatively slow-growing

Environment: freshwater & brackish water

Climate: tropical

Distribution: Gazetteer Asia and Oceania: restricted to the Gulf of Papua drainages and coastal waters of New Guinea.

Description: Vertebrae: 24. Has fewer gill rakers than any other Coius. Scales in lateral series 42-43, in transverse series 8-12/1/18-20. First gill arch with 15-17 rakers (vs. 18-21 in C. microlepis and 20-23 in C. quadrifasciatus). Vertebrae 11=13 (vs. 10=14 in all other Coius. Branched anal fin rays usually 10; branched dorsal rays 14-15 (Ref. 10425).

Biology: Occurs in brackish river mouths, coastal lagoons and rivers above tidal influence.

Temperament: semi-aggressive, more aggressive towards same or similar species.

Water paramenters: Prefers clean water, pH 7.0-8.0, temperature 76-82 degrees F. This datnoid species prefers light brackish conditions, specific gravity around 1.005, over freshwater environments. IME, this species does not like pHs below 6.5.

Feeding: Although often fed live fish, this species can be trained to accept shrimp, krill, frozen brine shrimp, beefheart, earthworms, and even Hikari Sinking Carnivore Pellets.
 
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